Tuesday

Grass Carp in Texas

On occasion, the introduction of an invasive species isn't fully accidental. Many plants and animals arrive here with positive intent – as a pet or ornamental shrub or for agricultural purposes  –  but simply slip beyond our control.

The most obvious examples of this would be the intentional release of aquarium fish and plants into domestic waterways. But accidental release can also occur.

How can you help?


Avoid situations where aquarium pets, aqua-cultured plants and animals or live bait are released into waterways – whether that might be accidentally or purposely.



Ctenopharyngodon idella, the Asian Grass Carp, was initially brought to the U.S. as an aquaculture control measure in the 1960s. Individuals eventually escaped and were soon spreading. 

The introduction of Grass carp was certainly not intended to lead to ecological problems but it unfortunately has. They can inhabit a variety of habitats, are prodigious reproducers and can harbor parasites, all of which potentially change ecosystem dynamics.

There are breeding populations in Texas from both legal experiments that escaped and illegal stocking. These are known to exist in Lake Conroe and in the Trinity River - Galveston Bay area.


More reading on Asian Grass Carp in Texas:




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