Tuesday

National Hunting & Fishing Day

Thanks for sharing your passion with friends and family ... and us!


It’s an incredible feeling best shared with a friend: reeling in a trout for your dinner or harvesting your first dove or buck. National Hunting and Fishing Day — this Saturday, September 26 — celebrates all who hunt, fish and shoot, but particularly those who invite along someone new to the sport.

 

Many Texas hunters and anglers belong to conservation organizations and actively contribute time, money and effort to help wildlife populations and their habitats. Hunting and fishing license fees fund state efforts to provide healthy and sustainable natural resources.

 

To say THANK YOU to all who participate and share that experience, enter our contest on FacebookInstagram and Twitter. Click and tell us what/who sparked your love of hunting or fishing. Three commenters who offer great photos and stories will win a $50 Cabela's gift card. Don't delay: Deadline is Monday, September 28, 2020.

 

Who knows? Your story could end up here on our magazine blog!


 

Launched in 1971 by Congress, NHF Day has consistently recognized hunters and anglers for their leadership in wildlife and conservation. NHF Day is observed and celebrated the fourth Saturday in September every year.

Social media superstars "Dude Perfect," five college roommates from Texas A&M University with 50 million subscribers and nine billion views of their videos, are honorary chairs this year. 

“Participation in activities like hunting and fishing are richly rewarding experiences,” says Gov. Greg Abbott.  “Not only do they create thousands of jobs and revenue for our great state but they are also great opportunities to deepen human relationships and reconnect with the environment.”

 

Across the nation, including here in Texas, populations of white-tailed deer, redfish and other game species were almost wiped out by the early to mid-20th century from decades of unregulated exploitation. But today most fish and game have come back to plentiful abundance.

 

In modern Texas, hunting and fishing remain a cultural and economic force. In fact, the traditions are gaining traction among some urban audiences as a logical extension of the local food movement.

 

Texas Parks & Wildlife magazine has a new “locavore” web page with wild game tips and recipes from chefs as well as hunting and fishing adventure features to get you inspired. We take you from classic dove poppers to elegant main dishes.

 

Of course, the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department has all the information you need to get educated, licensed and outdoors for fun and recreation. Check out their hunting and fishing education pages. Sign up for a mentored hunting workshop next summer and grow your knowledge and confidence before you hunt. (This YouTube video lets you experience a mentored workshop before you sign up.)

 

Next time you head out to the lake or hunting lease, think about taking along a first-timer, child or grandchild, friend, co-worker or neighbor. It will not only enrich their lives, but your life, too. 

 

 

5 comments:

  1. I am one who does not believe in killing GOD'S animals, but I love to fish & love to hunt,but the hunting part to me is hunting a good place to fish.🐟👍

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    1. Are you a vegetarian? If so, I respect your choice. If not, you're killing one of God's creature's every time you order a burger, a pork chop or a steak. You're just hiring someone else to kill it for you.

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  2. Was taught to fish and hunt at an early age of eight. My grandfather was a hunter and my father did both hunt and fish. Myself fish with my wife and also hunt . I am now passing it on to my grandkids

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  3. My parents were lucky enough to have a house on a canal near Estes Flats. Our neighbor three doors down was a marine biologist and indulged my brothers and I with as much as we could learn about the coast. He was an avid sportsman and spoke of conservation keeping only the right size fish in the early 70's, which was not a popular opinion then. Fishing with him, we learned to study things and put them back where they belong. Seahorses showed up once, egg cases on crabs, we even studied the differing colors of shrimp in seasons...and anything we caught and consumed, we identified every organ on it, worm, parasite or egg case. He was the only fisherman I knew with a cool microscope. He also taught us to observe animals around fish habitats....birds, island life like havelinas, coyotes, and snakes, and even the rarely-seen-in-the-early-80's-turtles (before TEDs on shrimp boats) and brown pelicans (so many more of them now!). He never thought twice about showing a little girl how to catch her bait, bait a hook and clean her catch and I love him for that. He died a few years ago, and clad in my Hawaiian shirt at request of his widow, I was happy to see a redfish made of carnations next to his casket. My family and I will never forget you, Mr. Vernon, for showing us the wonders of the world around us.

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  4. My daddy was a farm boy and hunted and trapped in his younger years. He took me into the woods when I was just little - 4 or so. Taught me to hunt (meat hunting only) and we hunted together many times. Didn't matter when or where or if we even got something, that was the best times that my dad and I shared!

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